WATCH: Jay Z Declares The War On Drugs “An Epic Fail” 

Check out this scathing eye opening short documentary in which Hov addresses the war on drugs in the U.S.

Why are white men poised to get rich doing the same thing African-Americans have been going to prison for?

New York Times:

This short film, narrated by Jay Z (Shawn Carter) and featuring the artwork of Molly Crabapple, is part history lesson about the war on drugs and part vision statement. As Ms. Crabapple’s haunting images flash by, the film takes us from the Nixon administration and the Rockefeller drug laws — the draconian 1973 statutes enacted in New York that exploded the state’s prison population and ushered in a period of similar sentencing schemes for other states — through the extraordinary growth in our nation’s prison population to the emerging aboveground marijuana market of today.

We learn how African-Americans can make up around 13 percent of the United States population — yet 31 percent of those arrested for drug law violations, even though they use and sell drugs at the same rate as whites.

Do you agree with Jay Z or nah? 

Join the discussion.

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Marchers Step Forward Against Meth Epidemic In Pine Ridge Reservation

RED POWER MEDIA

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Kevin Woster reports: March 25, 2016 

Parents and tribal officials on the Pine Ridge Reservation are facing a worrisome surge in methamphetamine use among tribal youth.

Friday in Pine Ridge Village, family members of meth users and their supporters marched to the front of the meth fight, proclaiming a grassroots campaign to rid the reservation of the potentially deadly drug.

They began at noon in light rain and chill winds, marching from the hill where the old Indian Health Service Hospital used to stand and down U.S. Highway 18 into town.

Their goal is for tribal members, and in particular the young, to withstand the storm of methamphetamine use that has been sweeping across their reservation.

Nineteen-year-old Jerica Dreamer, a former user, brought hard personal experience to Friday’s march against meth.

“It’s a bad thing. It’s really bad,” she said. “It hurts you. And it makes your body feel real…

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Heroin Overdose Deaths Are Now Ruled Homicides

A county coroner in Pennsylvania has started ruling heroin overdose deaths as homicides, saying drug dealers are murderers. 

Lycoming County Charles Kiessling Jr. had been marking overdose deaths as accidental, which he called standard practice, but said he’s trying to raise awareness of a heroin epidemic that contributed to a 13 percent increase in overdose deaths in Pennsylvania in one year.

Kiessling told The Daily Item of Sunbury:

“If you chose to sell heroin, you’re killing people and you’re murdering people. You’re just as dead from a shot of heroin as if someone puts a bullet in you.”

He has ruled one overdose death in 2016 as a homicide, with four others pending the results of toxicology testing.

Homicide is defined as a death caused by another person. Not all homicides are determined to be crimes, and the decision on whether charges should be filed is made by prosecutors.

Read the entire article | Coroner Starts Ruling Heroin Overdose Deaths As Homicides

Former Aide To President Richard Nixon Admits That “War On Drugs” Specifically Targeted Blacks

Richard Nixon’s Former Aide Reveals The Truth Behind The “War On Drugs” 

Harper’s Magazine writer Dan Baum has shared with the world the purpose behind the infamous “War On Drugs” that became popular in the 1970’s under President Richard “Tricky Dick” Nixon.

Nixon’s invention of the war on drugs as a political tool was cynical, but every president since — Democrat and Republican alike — has found it equally useful for one reason or another. Meanwhile, the growing cost of the drug war is now impossible to ignore: billions of dollars wasted, bloodshed in Latin America and on the streets of our own cities, and millions of lives destroyed by draconian punishment that doesn’t end at the prison gate; one of every eight black men has been disenfranchised because of a felony conviction.