Movie Trailers

“All Eyez On Me” Hits Theaters On Tupac’s Birthday — June 16th

All Eyes

The long awaited and highly anticipated biopic film based around one of hip hop’s most prolific artists, Tupac Shakur, is ironically set to debut on his birthday, June 16th. He would have been 46 years old.

The film, which chronicles Pac’s journey from up and coming rapper to international hip hop and media sensation, looks to be another street classic. The look and feel of the movie reminds me of one of my other favorite hood masterpieces, “Straight Outta Compton” which debuted in 2015. I appreciate how this film incorporates his parents, Afeni and Mutulu Shakur, and portrays their lives as Black Panther Party members and how it shaped and created — Tupac.

Check out the official movie trailer:

Tupac’s stepfather, Mutulu Shakur is currently still incarcerated for his alleged role in a 1981 Brinks bank robbery. His mother Afeni, who was also a Black Panther Party member and the central figure of one of Pac’s most revered songs, “Dear Mama,” went on to become one of the world’s most well loved and respected political activists for the black community. She passed away May 2, 2016 of cardiac arrest. Up until her unexpected death, she oversaw her late son’s estate and music dealings. Tupac is still said to have hundreds of unreleased songs and poems in his catalog.

There are multiple petitions in support of Mutulu, the former bank robber turned revolutionary leader and activist who is now referenced as, “Dr.” Hopefully the success of this movie will aid in expediting Dr. Mutulu’s release, who is now in his mid 60’s. According to Biography channel, he was set to be released in 2016.

MutuluIsWelcomeHere.com was launched by supporters of the former Black Liberation Member, who has been in jail for over 30 years.

Check out this post for more information on how to join the #FreeMutuluShakur movement. Will you be watching “All Eyez On Me” on June 16th? I know I will!

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FEATURED POST: Athleticism And Fashion In Wonder Woman


by Elan Paulson

Even the “god killer” Amazonians can still be slaves to fashion.

I am certain that the writers of the new Wonder Woman film made it a top narrative priority to get Diana Prince into a dress store in suffrage-era America. Her fellow shopper exclaims with that Diana has tried on over 200 dresses, but viewers know she is looking for the outfit that will enable her to blend in as well as fight. The film makes clear visual contrasts between the strapless gold dress that Diana kicks butt in on Themyscira and the dark, high-necked piece that is trying to “choke her” in 20th century Britain. On one island women do the killing, on the other women’s fashion does.

And yet, even in the outfit Diana settles for—a simple black dress with a white shirt resembling a masculine suit—Diana’s femininity/sexuality is still not covered up enough. Barely concealing his attraction to her, Steve Trevor decides she needs fake glasses to further obscure her distracting beauty. Shortly after, the camera fixes on Diana’s glasses, stomped on and broken in the street, following her first back-alley fight. There are a plethora of “gaze” metaphors that I won’t unpack here.

The film makes easy retrospective social commentary: the clothing designed by men for women that restricted their movement is an allegory for their oppression, whereas clothing designed for movement, presumably designed for women on an all-women island, symbolized liberation.

And yet, there are still other moments in Wonder Woman that complicate this easy distinction. When Diana needs a fancy dress to sneak into a Nazi gala, she finds an unattended female party-goer who has impatiently decided to walk to the gala (another fellow “empowered” 20th century women, though far overshadowed by Diana).

But rather than dragging her into the bushes to steal her clothes right away, for a full few seconds Diana walks alongside the woman, sizing her up to see if the dress fits. There are few men who take the time to size up soon-to-be stolen clothing for fit. It stands out as both reinforcing a female stereotype (something that men wouldn’t do) but also showing Diana as a discerning female shopper. Where will she hide the god-killer sword in such a form-fitting number? (Spoiler! She uses the sword’s hilt to accessorize the dress.)

In an interview, Director Patty Jenkyns writes that “To me, [Wonder Woman] shouldn’t be dressed in armor like men […] It should be different. It should be authentic and real – and appealing to women […] It’s total wish-fulfillment […] I, as a woman, want Wonder Woman to be hot as hell, fight badass, and look great at the same time.”

Wishes may be had in Wonder Woman, but what isn’t different between the experiences of the goddess Diana and regular mortal women is the need to continue to navigate the complicated relationship between athletic and fashionable clothing, to achieve the often culturally-imposed desire to fight badass and look great at the same time.

For me the two pieces of clothing that serve the most meaning do not serve fashion at all. First, Diana’s gauntlets (or as Wikipedia informs me are “bracelets,” which are apparently an allegory for emotional control) are activated early in the film, revealing the first hints to Diana that she is more than a regular warrior princess.

Second, Diana’s headband (which the internet also corrects me is a “tiara”) has a more complex comic book backstory that is either downplayed or rebooted in favour of representing not only Diana’s status as royalty but also a connection to her family, particularly her Amazonian mentor, aunt Antiope, who trained and sacrificed for Diana.

So, while even bracelets and tiaras may suggest that women’s power lies in accessorizing, I appreciate how the film embraces (rather than avoids) women’s ongoing negotiation of athleticism and fashion, the clothing that (literally and metaphorically) liberates and constricts. May the jewelry women inherit from their female family members be continued reminders of the challenges that fashionistas past—both real and fictional—have had to face.

Originally posted on: Athleticism and Fashion in Wonder Woman (Guest Post) — Fit Is a Feminist Issue

Have you seen the new “Wonder Woman” movie yet?

According to CNN Money:

The latest film in Warner Bros.’ DC Extended Universe exceeded expectations at the box office, bringing in $103.1 million for its opening in North America this weekend.

That makes the superhero film starring Gal Gadot and directed by Patty Jenkins the biggest opening ever for a female director. The previous record holder, “Fifty Shades of Grey,” brought in $85.2 million in 2015.

“Wonder Woman” is the first major superhero film to be led by a woman, and it was women who helped the film to the top of the box office this weekend.

Pretty Impressive!

Check out the official movie trailer:

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WATCH: Tupac’s “All Eyez On Me” Trailer


“All Eyez On Me,” originally titled “Tupac,” is the upcoming American biographical drama film directed by Benny Boom, produced by LT Hutton, David C. Robinson, James G. Robinson and written by Steven Bagatourian, Stephen J. Rivele, Christopher Wilkinson, Ed Gonzalez, and Jeremy Haft. 

The film stars the following actors/actresses — Demetrius Shipp, Jr. (Tupac Shakur), Danai Gurira (Afeni Shakur), Kat Graham (Jada Pinkett), Dominic L. Santana (Suge Knight), Jamal Woolard (Biggie Smalls), Annie Ilonzeh (Kidada Jones), Lauren Cohan (Lelia Steinberg), Grace Gibson (Faith Evans), Harold House Moore (Dr Dre.)

Hopefully this movie will hit theaters soon!

Will YOU be watching?