Foreign

Lawmakers Brawl In Uganda Parliament Over Presidential Age Limit

Ugandan politicians went to war for 2 days straight in a WWE tag team style brawl over the country’s presidential age limit.

Reuters — Lawmakers brawled in Uganda’s parliament for a second day running on Wednesday over a fiercely disputed move to change the constitution to let long-ruling President Yoweri Museveni run for re-election after age 75.

MPs exchanged blows and kicks, with some using microphone stands as crude weapons in the melee, and at least two female lawmakers were carried out of the chamber after collapsing, a Reuters journalist on the scene said.

At least 25 MPs opposed to the proposed constitutional amendment to prolong Museveni’s tenure were forcibly ejected on orders of the speaker for involvement in fighting on Tuesday. All other like-minded MPs then walked out.

After calm returned, ruling party MP Raphael Magyezi introduced the contested motion authorizing parliament to draft and present a bill that would lift the constitution’s age cap on presidential candidates.

Under the existing constitution, eligibility to stand as a presidential candidate in the East African country has an age ceiling of 75.

That makes Museveni, 73, in power since 1986 and increasingly accused of authoritarianism and a failure to curb corruption, unqualified to seek re-election at the next polls in 2021. Removing the age cap would erase that barrier.

Smh, clearly the US isn’t the only country that has ahem… “president probs.” 

It’s really shameful that politicians and lawmakers can’t seem to come together and do their jobs without pure hellfire and brimstone unleashing. It’s unfortunate that they don’t seem as concerned about helping the people as they do “flexing their power” among each other, meanwhile WE THE PEOPLE are casualties of the war.


Join the discussion.

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Ex Jamaican Gangster Finds God In Homeless Shelter


Via interamerica.org– Andrew Carter first fired an automatic weapon at the age of 14 when he joined a street gang in Jamaica’s capital, Kingston.

He spent the next 15 years talking tough and shooting people as he rose through the ranks to become a leader of a gang engaging in the illegal sales of gasoline and marijuana.

Then one evening, several friends were chatting on the porch of Andrew’s house, and one of them accidentally fired an automatic weapon into the roof. Nobody was injured, but the incident scared Andrew’s girlfriend, Annette, who fell out of the bed in fright. She pleaded with Andrew to move to her uncle’s house in another town.

Around that time, Andrew’s brother, who was in the same gang, was arrested for murder and received a 20-year sentence. He later died in prison.

Andrew decided to start a new life.

“I gave it all up when my brother went to prison,” Andrew said in an interview.

Andrew and his girlfriend moved to the uncle’s house, and Andrew began to work as a security guard. Several years passed, and Annette left Andrew to marry a man in the United States. Andrew could no longer stay in the uncle’s house, so he moved across the island to another town where several relatives lived. He found a new job as a security guard.

Consequences From the Past

His quiet life was shattered in December 2015 when a cousin, speaking in a conversation with friends, inadvertently blurted out his history with gangsters.

“Andrew isn’t who he seems to be,” the cousin said. “He used to be a gangster and shoot people.”

The news quickly spread through the town. Thirteen armed men marched over to Andrew’s house, scared and determined to kill him. Andrew disdainfully looked out the window at them.

“They were simple country people, and I had grown up in a tough, concrete ghetto,” he said.

He went to get his guns to shoot them.

But Andrew’s sister heard about the standoff, and she rushed over to her brother’s house. She saw the guns and begged him not to shoot anyone.

“If you shoot them, then I and your other relatives won’t be able to live here,” she said. “It would be best if you left instead.”

Andrew wanted to protect his family, so he threw some clothes into a backpack and boldly walked out the front door. He wasn’t afraid of the armed men in the street.

“From when I was 14, I was taught to hold and shoot weapons,” he said. “So, I wasn’t afraid.”

The armed men watched silently as Andrew walked past. Andrew didn’t say a word to them, either.

Homeless in Kingston

He had nowhere to go, so he returned to his birthplace, Kingston. Unable to find work, he slept at a bus station for 2 ½ months.

Then one day, another homeless man told him about a place called the Good Samaritan Inn. The man said the community center was run by the Seventh-day Adventist Church and offered free hot meals, a place to bathe and do laundry, and beds to sleep.

Andrew couldn’t believe his eyes when he saw a crowd of 300 people lined up to eat at the Good Samaritan Inn.

“This is the first time that I had seen people fed like that,” he said.

He received a bed at the Good Samaritan Inn, and soon he began working there as a security guard. Later, he took Bible studies, and he was baptized in 2016.

Andrew loves working at the Good Samaritan Inn.

“I want to help as much as I can,” he said. “I’m very happy that I’m alive and happier than I ever dreamed possible. It gives me a lot of joy to be able to give to others.”

Andrew has reconnected with his relatives, including a sister and brother who are Adventist. He learned that his mother was baptized into the Adventist Church before dying in 2011. He is now 51 and preparing to get married for the first time.

“I am trying to be very faithful and put my trust and faith in God,” he said.

Part of the 2015 Thirteenth Sabbath Offering went to refurbish the Good Samaritan Inn in Kingston, Jamaica, and to expand its work to include a free medical and dental center for the homeless. Thank you for helping the Good Samaritan Inn reach out to people like Andrew.

The Guy Whose Only Job At Rio Olympics Is To Pass Out Condoms

When I think of s-e-x the Olympic Games does not come to mind. 

Apparently the world thinks differently. 

Via Jason Geerbs of Thought Catalog:

The Olympics have gotten the reputation of being quite a sexed up affair, and the Rio Olympics are looking to be no exception.

The first time condoms usage was tracked for an Olympics was the 1988 athletic gathering in Seoul where 8,800 rubbers were passed out. In the Beijing Olympics eight years ago, 100,000 condoms were passed out, and it looks like Rio will surpass that number by quite a bit.

Condoms are distributed to athletes via green vending machines throughout the Olympian village. However, in a pinch, this guy — a noble hero named Eric — carries around a huge bag of condoms to hand out to anyone who may be in need.

Rodger Sherman — the reporter who revealed the tireless work of this young patriot — said Eric was unable to give an interview because he had to “deliver more condoms.”
Just another case of sexual tension getting in the way of important journalism, I suppose. 

Shout out to Team Jamaica representing in Rio.

Check out this photo of some of the show girls out in Rio, I can now clearly see how s-e-x is a key factor in this guy Eric having a j-o-b. Wowzers. Join the discussion. 
#Rio2016 

Pakistani Social Media Star Strangled by Brother In‘Honor Killing’

  

Qandeel Baloch, one of Pakistan’s most famous and controversial social media stars, has been strangled to death in what police are calling a case of so called “honor” killing in the city of Multan in the country’s province of Punjab.

Azhar Akram, Multan’s chief police officer, told CNN that Baloch was killed by her brother in her family’s home after he had protested at the “kind of pictures she had been posting online.”

After going on the run, the brother was later arrested and confessed on a video that police showed at a news conference.
Baloch’s father Muhammad Azeem reported her death to the police.

Baloch, 25, was from the Punjabi town of Kot Addu and had risen to fame due to the brazenly sassy, and increasingly political, videos that she had started posting on Facebook.

Her videos were not very different from thousands others shared by 20-something social media celebrities around the Internet — she pouted like a kitten into the camera, discussed her various hairstyles and shared cooing confessions from her bedroom about her celebrity crushes.

Baloch pushed boundaries
Yet in Pakistan, her flirty antics were unusual, pushing the boundaries of what’s acceptable of women in Pakistan. 

According to the World Economic Forum’s 2015 Gender Gap Report, Pakistan was second to last on the list of 145 countries with regards to gender disparity.

Read more: Pakistani Social Media Star Qandeel Baloch Strangled by Brother in So-Called ‘Honor Killing’: Police — KTLA

U.S. Border Security Wants To See What You Post On Social Media Before You Enter The Country

Many conspiracy theorists will tell you that Big Brother (a.k.a., the government) is watching your every move. That notion isn’t sounding as batty as it used to as government officials seek to find solutions to tighten border and national security. Last week, a proposal was submitted to the Federal Registrar by Customs and Border Protection…

via U.S. Border Security Wants To See What You Post On Social Media Before You Enter The Country — Bossip