Rappers Snoop Dogg & The Game Meet With L.A. Gangs In Effort To Stop Violence

Hip-hop artist the Game urged gang members from across Southern California on Sunday morning to converge on a South Los Angeles community center for a town-hall style meeting about curbing violence. 

The Game, whose real name is Jayceon Taylor, told the hundreds gathered for a town-hall style meeting at a South Los Angeles community center that he was pushing a positive message because one day, he hopes his daughter will be able to walk the streets “a little safer.”

He told the crowd:

“Your life should mean more to you. Your life should mean more to you than what you’re showing.”

Nation of Islam Minister Tony Muhammad, who helped organize the event, said it’s time for the black community to come together.

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Good morning world. I hope everyone slept well….. Los Angeles, on behalf of myself @SnoopDogg, & the honorable @louisfarrakhan I want to extend the invitation to all CRIPS, BLOODS, ESE's & all other gang members, major figures & GANG LEADERS from every hood in our city as well as the surrounding cities to our meeting 11am this morning, July 17th at 8039 S. Vermont Ave Los Angeles, California 90044 to have the much needed conversation amongst ourselves about our influence on the youth in our respective neighborhoods & how we can serve as better role models to them & the brothers we stand beside daily…. Because the sad truth that no one wants to face is, before we can get OUR LIVES TO MATTER to anyone else… We have to show that OUR LIVES MATTER to US !!!! WE have been responsible for more of the KILLING of ourselves than anyone else by a long shot & the percentages in which BLACK on BLACK, BLACK on BROWN, BROWN on BLACK, BROWN on BROWN murders are so fucking high verses any other killing of us that it is disgusting & this needs to be addressed & laid to rest !!!!! Don't think we can't change it & better ourselves, lead by example & make our city a safer place for our children…. Because together, WE CAN !!!! I'm asking everyone who will attend: DO NOT bring any weapons or anything illegal. Do not come high or belligerent.. We don't need any HOT HEADS or anyone there for the wrong reasons or you will respectfully dealt with & REMOVED from the building… We will stand as we are, UNIFIED. I'm calling ALL GANGS, of ALL RACES, ALL GROWN MEN affiliated or not & WE WILL STAND UNIFIED SUNDAY !!!! Our numbers are all the weapons we need !!! We do not need to be dumb, retarded or uncivilized Sunday… ALL WE NEED IS EACH OTHER… I will not lead any of you into a trap !!!!! LET'S do the opposite of what we've been doing & show the world that we are MORE than the problem… Thank you – Game

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Read more of this story on LA Times.com 

LA Police Commission to Decide If Fatal Shooting Of Woman In Alley Was Justified

The Los Angeles Police Commission is expected to decide Tuesday whether an officer followed the department’s policies for using deadly force last summer when he shot and killed a woman in a South L.A. alley. 

Redel Jones, 30, was fatally shot by a Los Angeles police officer in August 2015 after she allegedly moved toward officers with a knife. 

As hundreds of demonstrators descended on downtown Los Angeles, the city’s Police Commission on Tuesday faulted two LAPD officers for their tactics leading up to the killing of a black woman in South L.A. last year, but found that the fatal shooting did not violate the department’s deadly force policy.

The board’s decision touched off protests outside the LAPD’s downtown headquarters that quickly moved across the street to City Hall, where activists pounded on the glass doors and decried how police officers use force, particularly against African Americans. In the year after Redel Jones’ death, her name has been chanted at meetings, written on signs carried at protests and spread on Twitter as a hashtag.

Jones, 30, was killed after Los Angeles police say she moved toward an officer while holding a knife. The LAPD has said Jones matched the description of a woman who robbed a nearby pharmacy about 20 minutes earlier, prompting officers to pursue her into the alley.

But a woman who said she saw the August 2015 shooting from her car questioned why police opened fire, telling the Los Angeles Times that Jones was running away from the officers and never turned toward them.